Earning a Living and Beyond
I am a systems engineer and analyst by profession. My career started at Bell Laboratories in
1965 when I was hired on as a technician. In 1971, I received a Bachelor of Science degree from
Monmouth College (now University) in Long Branch, New Jersey; and two years later, in 1973,
an MSEE degree from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (Brooklyn Poly as we used to called
it) in Brooklyn, New York. I then joined a systems engineering design group at Bell Laboratories
that later went on to develope the first commercial cellular system in the United States.
I am also a holder of two patents, both in wireless, and have authored and presented many
technical papers on that subject to the professional technical community. In March 1978, I was
privileged to receive IEEE’s Vehicular Technology Group’s Paper of the Year Award,
and in March 1984, I received Bell Laboratories’ Distinguished Technical Staff Award. I am
also a member of the Eta Kapa Nu Electrical Engineering Honor Society.

Over the years I have expanded my interests to other technical fields such as aerodynamics,
hydrostatics and hydrodynamics, and naval architecture. I am also a holder of a Private Pilot
Certificate with over 200 hours in single engine land aircraft.
In 1990 I was asked to join Bell Laboratories' internal Technical Education Center to lead a small group of people that
created a wireless curriculum for associate learner development. In that capacity I was directly involved in developing and
teaching courses in advanced wireless technologies in addition to managing the training group. I then left the Labs in early
2001 to join a small technical training organization where I continued to develop and teach courses on wireless to the
technical staff of several large high-tech companies that were involved in building various products.
Now that I no longer have to work full time for a living, I have much more time to spend doing the things the really enjoy
doing. My office, which doubles as a spare guest room, is set up with all I need to pursue my various interests. Shelves of
reference books and papers that I use all the time, and old but reliable PC on the desk top, printer, fax machine and
land-line phone, and a few models of ships and trains that I've built over the years right over the desk.
Holding a set H&W Titanic GA
plans.
Shelves of reference books and
papers.
Work area layout and shelves of models.
Ship models include:
   Yacht
America
   USS Enterprise (CVN-65)
   USS
Saipan (LHA-2)
   SS
Titanic